Gratitude?

As we live each and every day following a more-or-less routine order—waking, fumbling, doing, eating, bathing, and finally back to sleeping—we inadvertently fall into the pit of taking things for granted. As we successfully live each and every day, unscathed by any significantly dismal news, untouched by the mildly captivating gossips, and unreminded of how short life actually is, we take life for granted; we take the things and our being on this Earth for granted—we feel like we are entitled to the things we now have and will soon have.

I’m talking about you, yes you! This is bad, but you already know that, right? You know that our time here on Earth is short (Men: 80years. Women: 86years) and yet what you are doing there is spending endless amount of time on Instagram, scrolling down the unending abyss of photos that clearly do not concern you, again and again; spending lost hours on YouTube that will never ever be gotten back, relentlessly searching for something to gorge on—to satiate your thirst for entertainment. Whatever your vice is, I don’t blame you—because the habits we have are often propagated by the Mass media, the Western media in particular. I was like that before, too, unfortunately, like a hungry ghost on Earth on the quest for something that is exceptionally entertaining and perhaps of gossip-value—for I am human after all.

But isn’t it funny? In the mere span of 26 years (considering the web started in 1991), we have become this connected, and I’m terribly sure we’ll be even more so in the future given this massive collective need for sharing our lives, and the geniuses thinking of ways to exploit this fact—but fact is we have not; we have not grown connected. We have no doubt grown increasingly connected to the World, but we have also no doubt grown extensively disconnected to Ourselves.

My issue is with Time. As I have said before, “If it is just money that is expended, it is fine. But time is too—and time is never ever gotten back.” People still don’t realise the value of time in comparison to money. Yes, we have a self-refilling bank of time that is filled with 24 hours—1440 minutes or 86400 seconds—but how much of that is spent on resting, eating and doing all those necessary miscellaneous stuff? If we need 10,000 effective hours to be great at something we are doing (as rightly purported by Malcolm Gladwell in his book, Outliers), how many years do you think you need to rack up that amount of hours? Considering 1/3 of your daily time expense is on rest already—and we haven’t even taken focus into account. I may be spending an hour or two writing this post (take 2 on average) and if I write everyday—which I clearly don’t—I will need 5000 days of writing 2 hours daily to be good at writing—5000 days is 13 CONSECUTIVE YEARS OF UNPARALLELED FOCUS!! Impossible I say! If I do embark on this arduous journey of being a great writer, what then? What else can I master after? I will already be 35 years old then. What other things can I choose to do, provided I have no other commitments?

So do you now understand the essence of time? I had initially set out to write about gratitude but… Sorry. Yes… so what was it about gratitude that I wanted to write about? Hmm… I think it’s important to constantly remind yourself that time is ACTUALLY short—if it still hasn’t hit you, then I have failed—and it isn’t quite worth doing a few things, and it is worth doing the rest of things with freakishly aberrant effort (I can’t do that just for your info HAHA). Jokes aside, practice gratitude, and you’ll appreciate your time on Earth—that I promise you.

 

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Time is really short, be concerned with the things you do.

 

 

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